Posts Tagged ‘normal thyroid results’

Selenium and Grave’s Disease/ Other supplements

This is not a new information in fact, but I am mentioning it here because there was just another scientific research about Thyroid eye disease and Selenium that I feel I should share with all of you..

Recently conducted study titled Selenium and the course of mild Graves’ orbitopathy” was conducted by the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. What happened: They  carried out a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of selenium (an antioxidant agent) or pentoxifylline (an antiinflammatory agent) in 159 patients with mild Graves’ orbitopathy. The patients were given selenium (100 μg twice daily), pentoxifylline (600 mg twice daily), or placebo (twice daily) orally for 6 months and were then followed for 6 months after treatment was withdrawn. Primary outcomes at 6 months were evaluated by means of an overall ophthalmic assessment, conducted by an ophthalmologist who was unaware of the treatment assignments, and a Graves’ orbitopathy-specific quality-of-life questionnaire, completed by the patient. Secondary outcomes were evaluated with the use of a Clinical Activity Score and a diplopia score.

CONCLUSIONS made by the scientists: Selenium administration significantly improved quality of life, reduced ocular involvement, and slowed progression of the disease in patients with mild Graves’ orbitopathy.

Another older information about selenium as well:

On June 22, 2001 Dr. Barbara Gasnier reported the findings at the 83rd Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society in Denver, Colorado that selenium supplementation may prevent progression of autoimmune thyroid disease, especially during the onset of the disease. According to the researchers, selenium deficiency appears to contribute to the development and maintenance of autoimmune thyroiditis because of its effect on the function of selenium-dependent enzymes, which can modulate the immune system.

Selenium supplementation with 200mcg of sodium selenite may improve the inflammatory activity seen in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis, but whether this effect is specific for autoimmune thyroiditis or may also be effective in other organ-specific autoimmune diseases remains to be investigated. Selenium supplementation may lower free radical activity, which contributes to inflammation.

It appears that taking selenium without iodine will result in a decrease in production of Thyroxine (T4), although there may be an initial transient increase in T4 to T3 conversion and hence higher T3 and seemingly worse hyperthyroidism.

Bottom line:  Selenium may be helpful for both- hyperthyroidism and thyroid eye disease (mild, but who knows). I know that almost any laboratory can measure if you need any vitamins and supplements. Better check that as well.

I also know that muscle cramps (I used to have a lot of these and they’ll wake me up during the night) are well administered by taking magnesium.

But again, I would just take vitamins and supplements on my own, check better with your family practitioner first.

Stay well,

Svetla

TSH, FT3 and FT4 Test Results for Graves’ Disease and Hyperthyroidism

If you just left the doctor’s office with a piece of paper in your hand, given by your doctor with the following words “Your tests are abnormal– you may have Graves’ Disease or Hyperthyroidism– you probably have a lot of questions in your head. No more explanations. Doctors don’t have time to explain what are normal, what are abnormal thyroid test levels – just because they have scheduled about 15 to 20 patients per day and they can not afford any extra time for you and your health problems.

Next patient in line please..

I personally can understand your frustration, you helplessness and your despair. Because I have been there and I felt exactly the same way. I started to look for more information everywhere to find out what is a “normal thyroid levels” and how do I achieve this “normal thyroid results”- because I wanted to feel better, healthy and without Graves’ disease or Hyperthyroidism.

The thyroid test normal levels should be as follows; however different laboratories have different ways of measuring. Consult your doctor for a better understanding of your thyroid tests. Blood tests to measure TSH, T4 and T3 are readily available and widely used. The best way to initially test thyroid function is to measure the TSH level in a blood sample.

In late 2002, the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) issued new guidelines for the diagnosis and monitoring of hyperthyroid disease. In the guidelines, the NACB reported that the current TSH reference range — which usually runs from approximately 0.5 to 5.5 — may be too wide and actually may include people with thyroid disease. When more sensitive screening was done, which excluded people with thyroid disease, 95 percent of the population tested actually had a TSH level between 0.4 and 2.5.


TSH = 0.3-3.0 mIU/L (mU/L)
FT3 = 230-420 pg/d
FT4 = 0.8-1.5 ng/dl
T3= 70-180 ng/dL
T4 = 5.6-13.7 ug/dL


Thyroid Test Results

I was very confused some years ago, when I got my first thyroid blood test results. They did not mean anything to me- just numbers, which I can easily convert into symptoms.

 

If you, like me, just left the doctor’s office with a piece of paper in your hand, given by your doctor with the following words “Your tests are abnormal– you may have Graves’ Disease or Hyperthyroidism– you probably have a lot of questions in your head. No more explanations. Doctors don’t have time to explain what are normal, what are abnormal thyroid test levels – just because they have scheduled about 15 to 20 patients per day and they can not afford any extra time for you and your health problems.

 

Did you have a similar experience? Or may be your doctor was the best- compassionate, understanding and careful. Patients are looking for good doctors. And want to know the bad ones too. If you like, share your experience, it’s much appreciated.

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